Canola Oil


CANOLA OIL is a vegetable oil derived from a variety of rapeseed that is low in erucic acid, as opposed to colza oil.

There are both edible and industrial forms produced. Canola oil is also used as a source of biodiesel.

Rapeseed flower and oil

Canola was originally a trademark name of the Rapeseed Association of Canada, and the name was a condensation of “Can” from Canada and “OLA ” meaning “Oil, low acid”, but it is now a generic term for edible varieties of rapeseed oil in North America and Australasia.

About 23 kg (51 lb) of canola seed makes 10 L (2.64 US gal) of canola oil. Canola oil is a key ingredient in many foods. Its reputation as a healthy oil has created high demand in markets around the world, and overall it is the third-most widely consumed vegetable oil, after soybean oil and palm oil. Canola oil is considered safe for human consumption.

In 2006, canola oil was given a qualified health claim by the United States Food and Drug Administration for lowering the risk of coronary heart disease, resulting from its significant content of unsaturated fats; the allowed claim for food labels states A 2014 review of health effects from consuming plant oils rich in alpha-linolenic acid, including canola, stated that there was moderate benefit for lower risk of cardiovascular diseases, bone fractures, and type-2 diabetes.

Rapeseed

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canola_oil

How old are eggs we buy in the stores?

European and American laws about eggs are very different.

But, how old are store bought

eggs in the States?

I found this very interesting blog article, surfing the web, so I’m sharing it with you.

How Old is the Average Supermarket Egg? | Fresh Eggs Daily®

https://www.fresheggsdaily.com/2016/01/how-old-is-average-supermarket-egg.html

In this article you can read:

Q: How old are the eggs being sold in the grocery store?

A: It’s just about impossible to tell, but they could be up to 2 months old. Yup, really.

By law, an egg can be sold for up to 30 days after the date it was put in the carton. Yes, that says ‘put in the carton’, not laid or collected, but packaged. And I’m told (although I can’t find anything official in writing to confirm this) that a farmer has up to 30 days to package an egg after it’s laid. So that means a commercially sold egg can be two months old by the time you buy it.

What about Italy?

I couldn’t find a specific blog article so I checked the Carabinieri website

Le Uova http://www.carabinieri.it/cittadino/consigli/tematici/giorno-per-giorno/andiamo-al-supermercato/le-uova

An interesting section says:

. la data di scadenza, obbligatoria, non può essere posteriore al 28° giorno successivo alla data di deposizione per il consumatore, non può essere posteriore al periodo massimo di 21 giorni dalla data di deposizione per il venditore );

. Expiration day, which is mandatory for eggs, can’t be later than 28 days from the egg being laid. Actually eggs can be sold in the stores only within 21 days from the egg being laid down but the client, that bought the eggs before they were retired by the store, can eat them up to the 28th day.

What a big difference!